Mohave Indian Band

So after the last post friend Bill Yakes sent this photo of the Mojave Indian Band, circa 1915. Bill’s grandfather was in Needles taking pics at the time, though this is not one of his.

Here are some details Bill picked up about the band:

— the marching band was established in 1906 by “Professor Albert J. Eller,
who taught music at the Fort Mojave Indian Boarding School.” It later “fell
under the directions of both Ned White and Jack Jones [both Mojaves] at
separate times between 1910 and 1952.”

— they played at the dedication of Hoover Dam (1930) and the reception for
Gov. Earl Warren (1950), as well as numerous other occasions.

— There is a photo dated 1924 of “Jack’s Mojave Jazz Band”. I assume this
was Jack Jones.

— The band was also known as the C. A. Simon’s Indian Band “in the early
years, played every Saturday evening for over 25 years on Front Street Read The Article

Josiah Red Wolf: Nez Perce War vet–and musician

I was digging through the small—and often most interesting—pieces of literature that Alvin collected along the way to his books and work as an advocate for Indians and the earth. Among the conference reports, ethnographic studies, newspaper clippings, and student papers was an article from Westways magazine, September 1977 by M. Woodbridge Williams, “Legacy of Survival.” The piece recounts a 1970 meeting with Josiah Red Wolf, at that time the lone survivor of the Nez Perce War. (When Alvin began his research in the early 50s, there were three: Red Wolf, Albert Moore, and Sam Tilden.)
Angus Wilson, one-time tribal chair and a good friend of Alvin’s, accompanied Woodbridge. Josiah was 98 at the time, but he and Wilson soon had an animated conversation going in Nez Perce—Wilson had to get him off an agitated rant on the treaties.
Red Wolf had been just five years old during the War, had spent a year at Leavenworth and
Read The Article